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NPS board to send letter opposing health education standards draft

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The Norfolk Public Schools Board of Education approved a letter opposing the first draft of Nebraska’s health education standards during a meeting on Thursday.

The board will be sending the letter to the State Board of Education and Matthew Blomstedt, the state’s education commissioner.

The letter requested specifically that the second draft of the standards is published without “current sex education standards and other sensitive topics.”

“We believe that these topics are best taught by parents or guardians, within the context of family values, and we oppose their inclusion in the Nebraska State Standards,” the letter said.

The letter stated that the board of education believes it’s the parent’s responsibility — not the district’s — to teach students about human reproduction, gender identity, sexual orientation and sexuality.

Three members approved the letter while two opposed it. Sandy Wolfe, board president, said board members don’t have to sign the letter if they disagree.

Members who were against sending a letter said they wanted to request a better balance between including some sensitive topics and excluding others, or they wanted to simply ask for a second draft without naming specifics.

“I don’t feel that all the standards that we listed in our letter necessarily need to be removed,” said member Jenna Hatfield-Waite. “I don’t know if it’s important for us to take a specific stance — we only heard from one portion of our community at our last meeting.”

More than a dozen parents and community members voiced opposition to the health education standards draft at the board’s July 12 meeting. No one spoke in support of it.

Member Bruce Mitchell said he agrees with the parents who are against the draft.

“These proposals are a pedophile’s dream,” he said. “A pedophile’s goal is to take as long as it takes, whether days, months or years, to desensitize or groom children for their sick needs. This is opening the door for them and it’s not okay.”

The State Board of Education has received thousands of comments about the draft through letters, emails, phone calls and voiced in public meetings. The majority of Nebraskans who oppose it are concerned with the same topics and condemn their inclusion in the standards.

A second draft is still expected to be released later this summer. The State Board of Education estimated a vote on the final product will occur in the fall.

A new policy that was also approved Thursday will require the NPS school board to vote on whether to adopt the recommended standards if they pass. Previously, any standards recommended, but not required, by the State Board of Education were automatically adopted. Now members have to vote on state board standard recommendations.

If the board doesn’t adopt the standards, then members will adopt “locally-developed standards that are equal or exceed in rigor” within one year.

Wolfe said she encourages parents and the public to attend the board’s next meeting on Monday, Aug. 9, if they want to voice their opinions about the draft.

“I agree (that) we haven’t heard from both sides,” Mitchell said. “But they have had every opportunity to speak too and they haven’t spoken.”

This content was originally published here.

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